Sorrento, Italy (and a lil’ Naples)

On our way from Venice to Sorrento we had to make a quick overnight stop in Naples. I’ll keep the Naples bit short, but basically we don’t plan on going back there. We were already delayed out of Venice, which caused our inbound time to be pushed an hour or so. It was not a good travel day. Because we were late arriving, the air bnb host in Naples charged us a 10 euro after hours fee… Never heard of that, but just another way to top off a day of bad luck. After we dropped our bags it was about 9:30pm and we needed to grab some food. Naples is known for being a little less desirable, usually we take this with a grain of salt, but the rumors were true, Naples seemed pretty dangerous at night. I was thankful we only had a few hours there.


We took the first train out of Naples the next morning to Sorrento. The train was a locals commuter train so it was absolutely packed and very hot. Our bags took up a lot of space so we ended up standing in-between cars for the duration. The host of the air bnb in Sorrento picked us up from the train station and showed us to her beautiful home. This was the biggest space we had to ourselves thus far and she prepared breakfast each day. It was heaven!


Scott had spent some time in Sorrento a few years ago and absolutely loved it, so we went to some of his favorite spots while we were there. A pasta place that he claimed to be great, maybe was great a few years ago or his taste buds have matured, but it was far from great. It was okay though because we redeemed that meal for many more delicious meals at a local restaurant a block away. Lots of fresh pasta and rotisserie chicken with chips, yum! 


Our air bnb was about a 30 minute walk from Sorrento’s old town so we decided to check it out the first day we were there. Once you’ve seen one European old town, you’ve pretty much seen them all, but each have a few unique touches to them. Sorrento’s little twist is lemons, EVERYWHERE. Limoncello is said to have been invented there so there is everything flavored lemon, lemon, ornaments, clothes, hats, drinks, it was a yellow-lemon sanctuary. What also makes the old town so beautiful is it is right on Sorrento’s jagged coast line of sheer cliffs and deep blue water. We did our rounds, sampled some local gelato and then were on our way.


We had two full days in Sorrento so we tried to make the most of it. Scott’s favorite thing from his last Europe trip was renting a boat in Sorrento, of course I was totally on-board (no pun intended). Our rental was to be picked up first thing in the morning and we would have it til that evening. We packed a cooler of delicious cheeses, meats, and wine, lots of water, and sunscreen. 


The boat we had was a small speed boat with inflatable raft like material around it. We took off immediately towards Capri (you can only get here by boat and there were plenty of luxury yachts to boast). I’m not gonna lie the ocean was pretty rough and I felt super uneasy in the big swells in a tiny boat. Scott, of course, was un-phased. I asked him if it had been this rough when I rented the boat last time and he said only in the afternoon, so there was either hope that it would get better, or it would get worse. 


I got VERY seasick, bent over most of the time trying to make my stomach feel an ounce better. However, I was still able to enjoy the views of Capri and the bluest water I’ve ever seen in my life. The front side of the island is dotted with boats and hotels, but the backside is where it is at. Absoultely breathtaking cliffs, small reefs to snorkel, and warmer than Hawaii ocean water. We didn’t eat the whole day because it took my stomach a long time after each stop to get it’s bearings, but we swam a bit and enjoyed the views. 


After stopping on the backside of Capri for a bit we headed toward a town called Positano. Luckily, the water had calmed down a bit and I was able to enjoy the ride a bit more. Positano is a small village that sits a top sheer cliffs into the ocean. You can’t really understand the beauty of the village unless you see it from the ocean, it was spectacular! 


On our way back to the Sorrento port the choppy water picked up again and we just decided it would be best to get back to the port as quickly as possible. We hung out in the cove where the port was located for a bit and then returned the boat. The experience overall was spectacular, minus the getting sick part.



As soon as we were back on flat land our appetites kicked up. Remember we hadn’t eaten all day and were in the water and sun for most of it, so we were starving. There was a pizza place up the hill from our air bnb that had great reviews so we decided to try it out. Bar L’Archetto Pizzeria, was well worth the hike up the hill. We ordered three pizzas and enjoyed them at home that evening. It was a perfect end to a good day.


Our last full day in Sorrento was a bit of a bust. We woke up early with the intention to get to a swimming hole called Regina Giovanni Bath (The Queen’s Bath). It was incredibly touristy and crowded, we enjoyed it for maybe half an hour before it became too crazy and we decided to look for a beach elsewhere. The swimming hole was beautiful though, carved out of rock with a small passage to the sea. 


Unfortunately, our search for a better beach was unsuccessful. We walked A LOT and found no spots that were comfortable (hard point rocks to lay on are never good) or weren’t overrun with people. On the bright side we got our steps in for the day and got to walk along the ocean most of the day. 


From Sorrento we had to head back into Naples to take a flight to the Italian island of Olbia. This time we did not take a pit-stop in Naples and headed right for the airport. We were ready for the island life.

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